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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
are not in a position to do things that we otherwise would be in a position to in terms of shaping the environment to prevent war. so in my view, americas 60 veto fiscal picture increases the risk of conflict around the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily politic
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
look at jobs report tomorrow, is dismal. we're liking inflationary environment down the road. this is bad news. >> you could could make the argument invite blowing past short term helpful, long term payne full. melissa: spending cuts, tax hikes are very dramatic going over the cliff. when you look at numbers, still is like five to one raising taxes to cutting spending. >> that's right. melissa: no one is really talking about cutting spending. isn't that the first thing you would do? if your fiscal house was in such disarray, household at home, first thing you do is stop spending. no one is doing that. >> what scares me, is that point. whether you agree or disagree hiking taxes i am not a fan of it but i think it will come. we can get past this. charlie gasparino and i have argued this. one of the consequences of the election the president will probably get his way raising most rates. melissa: right. >> i'm not saying i'm a fan. let's get past that, let's make it happen. republicans realize you lost election you didn't suddenly lose your backbone. this should be precursor gett
because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive
are in a very good environment. and in north america, obviously, is important. europe is obviously important. but you're focusing on emerging markets. >> yes. >> even putting manufacturing, which i'm not sure, why would you build -- you're building a $100 million plant in africa. why not just export to avenue from from other places? why build a plant in africa? >> we have going to affect the organization from here. this was a unique opportunity because it was a state-owned factory. we managed to take over and they needed technology. and why produce there is a huge market. there are 1 billion people right now, the population will double. >> on the continent? >> yeah. on the continent of africa. they have a problem with feud security now. they have 60% of the global reserves of tillable land, which is great news, and only 20% of this land are used today, are farms today. therefore, it is a very interesting market. i'm very proud that we discovered it first and that we will be there also the first to manufacture from the western global players. >> so private corporation. who needs to go into th
're doing here and the implications on the overall security environment own the careen peninsula as well as in asia. martha: molly henneberg is live. north koreans may have run into a snag with this launch plan which may be biding some time. what can you tell us about it? >> reporter: martha, a weather snag. snow may have slowed north korea's efforts to put the missile together on the launch pad although the latest satellite pictures suggest it may be ready for liftoff if they decide to go ahead with it on monday. it appears all three parts of the rocket are mounted on the launch pad. north korea has tried four times since 1998 to launch a three stage rocket successfully but have been unsuccessful at it. officials say the north koreans gain more information each time they try. north korean leader kim jong-un believed to want to try the launch over next couple weeks because in part because the anniversary of his father's death falls into that time frame. mortgage that. martha: we know our u.s. navy has been mobilizing to that region in preparation for this and ahead of this. what do we kn
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. it -- if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolve's many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shut down in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are making -- politicians are supposed to play politics, that is no
environment the senate moved forward in a positive way and i believe we did the right thing. senator robert byrd of west virginia was a critical member of the gang of 14. in addition to his many, many accomplishments over the years, everyone knew then and knows now that there isn't anyone more well versed in the history of the senate or who was more protective of it as an institution. and i'll never forget that after the agreement was finalized and we were all sitting in a room, senator byrd said that he was proud of the work accomplished and that we -- quote -- "saved the senate." hearing those words from the distinguished senator byrd was undoubtedly one of the proudest moments of my career. and besides senator byrd, i've had the opportunity to serve with so many dedicated public servants in this body. i'd like to thank all of them. i start name so, i'll leave some out. so i just want to thank all present and past members of the senate that i've worked with and thank them for the occasion that i've had to work with them so closely. i also share the sentiment that many of my colleagues hav
of positively influenced environment is narrowing and may be closing, the establishment of a new opposition group combined with better understanding the population provides renewed opportunity for a more assertive u.s. policy. let me propose a couple of ideas. we need an effort to better coordinate international support for the moderate syrian opposition. several countries over the past 20 months have provided different degrees of military, political and humanitarian assistance to syrian opposition groups which has led to a common complaint from those in the opposition that the u.s. and international community have applied pressure on the syrian opposition to coalesce and coordinate yet these countries providing assistance to the opposition are sometimes not coordinated among themselves and work at cross purposes. they want us to eat our own advice. lack of international coordination served to exacerbate tension within the opposition inside the country to empower jihadists elements. u.s. leadership among countries would help to better coordinate these efforts and bolster the position of mod
. and providing an environment that is conducive for business growth. and it has everything to do with the cost of labor, and it has everything to do with rell la , regulation, it has everything to do with the cost of utilities. and we need to be competitive there is 23 other states that are competitive with michigan on business growth. this will grow jobs and give opportunity for union members, non-union members, folks to relocate to michigan, grow our population once again, keep our young people here after they graduate college, so a whole host of issues here that are affected by a positive change like this for michigan. which is why there is so much support for this bill. >> sure, those sound like many a positive reason why this is a good thing, but at the same time, you have democrats and they're saying what you're doing here, with this law, is laying the ground work for endless confrontation. do you think that's true, endless confrontation? how do you see this playing out? these people say this is just the beginning. >> there is no place for confrontation here. some of the behavior going
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
not a cause for celebration. still a difficult operating environment. under the former chancellor's plan, we would have been borrowing less in the next three years. because the government has failed to get our economy growing and because the policies have pushed us into recent double dip recession, they'll be pr rowing 212 billion pounds more than they planned. put that in context, that is the equivalent of what we in the uk will be spending this financial year on health, transport and defense in aggregate. >> you were talking quite rightly about the low level of he have credit growth in the uk, which has obviously been a feature of this period. but there's a question of what's cause and what's effect there. the banks will tell you that that problem is not so much availability of credit, there's credit demand and even in the mortgage sector which under normal circumstances you might have been eager to see people borrow money. we're seeing net repayments for the first time for a very, very long time. so you can take the economy to water, but you can't make it drink. how do you respond. >> i s
intelligence council global trends report takes into account fax tores like globalization and environment. europe, japan and russia are expected to continue declining economically. >>> standard charter reached at 327 dal million settlement with u.s. regulators for hiding the identity of iranian customers involved in dollar clearing transactions. the nearly three-year-investigation discovered criminal activity dating back to 2001. >>> boeing finalized a order for turkish airlines for 15, 777 extended range planes. the largest deal by value in turkish airline history. melissa: so is global warming to blame for hurricane sandy, right? former vice president al gore thinks so and blames president obama for not doing enough to fix it. >> it is causing these extreme weather events. dirty energy causes dirty weather. and we have to come to our senses and do something about it. i deeply respect our president. i'm grateful for the steps that he has taken but we can not have four more years of mentioning this occasionally and saying it's too bad that the congress can't act. melissa: but then, colora
and where to spend it, as they look at the u.s., what they want to see is a stable environment to put that money to work. if we can get that capital into the u.s. that will be a stimulus program by itself. >> frits, we pending on how you look at the numbers there are peel who say these two proposals aren't that far off. if you look at the numbers on each side and maybe try to find some common ground in the middle, maybe get to $1.2 trillion, where do you go on spending cuts is the big question because that seems to be a little easier. do you think this needs to be a three to one when it comes to revenue versus revenue increase or three to one when it comes to spending cuts versus revenue increases? do you see one to one, what would make you feel good looking around the globe and looking at what -- >> i'm not a tax expert so i can't give you a precise ratio. what we need to do is see a program where, if you look at reasonable numbers, you could see that the debt-to-gdp ratio comes down over time. as we go from $16 trillion, as we cross that 100% mark, we start looking more and more lik
american corporations have done a terrific job of coping with a tough regulatory environment, a tough financial. the aftermath of this financial crisis. a lot of negative publicity. and made a lot of money. >> we want to rise above. do we not have a debt ceiling right after that? >> the debt ceiling. the interesting question whether they're going to roll -- >> here's what i think. we haven't talked about this. so i say president obama allows us to go over the cliff temporarily so that all the rates go up. then the democrats introduce a bill to lower it for 9 %, do some other stiff -- 98%, do some other stuff they want to do. then the republicans say fine but we've got to hold the debt ceiling, that's the next bargaining chip. i don't think we can use rides above for the debt ceiling because we don't want to rise above the debt ceiling. we have to come one new buttons -- >> pins, the whole thing. yeah. that is a dilemma. what a polemic -- >> constantino is cutting me off. you're going to hold that against me? all right. >> you can hear the voice in my head. >> yeah. he's mad because i
. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes where they are and you shrink government down to where it pays for it. does it matter for the future and for growth which way you do it in your view? >> it does. if you put it all into like a tightening, so how much tightening occurs in the economy that would slow the economy, it's far better to actually reduce government spending than it is to actually raise taxes. >> although that hurts the economy, too. >> everything hurts the economy. so it's a question of which is most -- or least harmful and that tends to be cutting government spending. >> but i do think it's -- >> although tim geithner would disagree with me. >> one side wants to keep the government and entitlements like we have it. and the other side wants to take away all the excess government -- >> i think both sides agree that you need to do both. just
win, i think you will see a move toward a poor -- a more investment-friendly environment which, in my view, rusty, will see bonds continue their downward trend. and you could see a new equilibrium in terms of bond yields. closer to peers, ukraine, mongolia, even nigeria which are yielding between 4% and 6%. you have to remember that venezuela has been in double-digit yield territory over the past ten years. precisely because of these distortionary policies and the nationalization from the chavez regime. a move toward opening the oil market, possibly joint ventures which is what the opposition has been talking about, in investment in the oil market would be a net positive. and i think would push venezuelan yield down to around the 4.5%, 5.5% arena. >> okay. following developments out of miami from baltic capital markets. >>> as the year draws to a close, twitter has made loggers log in, tweet, and re-tweet in 2010. the most re-tweeted, president obama's four more years after winning re-election last month, accompanied by a picture of him embracing first lady michelle obama. aside from
environment to be more conducive to a successful military intervention and to allow the process of force generation to proceed, which does take time to train, equip, and develop a source for its employees. so in a sense we have few choices but to allow those processes to unfold, clearly we're concerned that it takes time to do so but i think we have a sense of moving forward with -- as rapidly as feeze, as rapidly as the circumstances will allow us to do so, recognizing the tremendous leadership that the african partners have already shown both in terms of political dynamics and the initiatives that are supporting this planning process at present. >> thank you. senator isaacson? >> i have just one question. ms. dory. if, as secretary carson said, military discontent with the government support was a major contributing factor to the coup, then the military will be a major contributor -- contributing factor to how successful an election is going to be. in your testimony you say there's a sunogo is in charge of the reform of the military for the interim government. do you know his capabilit
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)